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SPECIAL VOLUME HUMAN ECOLOGY

HUMAN ECOLOGY AND COMMUNITY

ROBERT J. GREGORY (Massey University, Palmerston North, NEW ZEALAND)

2003 • Pages: 112 • Size: 180x240 • ISBN 81-85264-32-5 • Binding: Hard •

Price: US$ 30/- Rs. 750/-

(Special Issue of Journal of Human Ecology - No. 11)

MAN-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIP

Those who work with ecological perspectives often choose and use human communities as convenient locales for both research and practice. Too, individuals and groupings within a community do communicate and relate with each other in bounded or circumscribed contexts, thus interlock together and influence each other as well as their surrounding physical and political environment. In addition, communities are purposeful in that people do follow various values and beliefs, thereby displaying still another of the many properties of system-ness. Community psychologists, like applied anthropologists, some public health workers, political scientists, and sociologists, have found that the sub-groupings within a community are definable, observable, and related to each other and to the larger power structures of a particular community. As such, these groupings are inherently intriguing as integral parts of the human condition. Palmerston North represents one such “typical” community in New Zealand. In this study, ten community psychology oriented researchers went forth to explore and describe specific groupings, then examined these parts and relationships of an entire community of people through use of ecological points of view. The process revealed both diversity and common themes, and as well, a fascinating and pleasant place to live.

CONTENTS

Foreword
[PDF File]

List of Contributors

  1. Introduction: Human Ecology and Community - Robert J. Gregory NEW ZEALAND)
    1-5
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  2. Palmerston North and the Manawatu: A historical approach - Peter Arends (GERMANY)
    7-11
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  3. Apple School - Rachel Anderson (NEW ZEALAND)
    13-21
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  4. High School, Music - Leith Pugmire (NEW ZEALAND)
    23-31
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  5. Linking Education with Business - Kate Brophy (NEW ZEALAND)
    33-38
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  6. Business enterprise: The engine of growth - Ninya Maubach (NEW ZEALAND)
    39-45
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  7. Military Camp - Mary Ann Gregory (NEW ZEALAND)
    47-59
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  8. A Gang - Joanna Morris (NEW ZEALAND)
    61-68
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  9. Drug Scene - Jonathan Aitken (NEW ZEALAND)
    69-76
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  10. Mental Health - Stephanie White (NEW ZEALAND)
    77-87
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  11. Kowhai: A Rest Home - Melanie Holdaway (NEW ZEALAND)
    89-94
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  12. Hinengaro - Deanna Hollis (NEW ZEALAND)
    95-101
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  13. Epilogue - Robert J. Gregory (NEW ZEALAND)
    103-104
    [Abstract] [Full Text]
  14. Index
    [PDF File]